Sponsored article – Latino College Students Get The Opportunity To Read “THANK YOU” Letters To Their Parents

This one’s for all the parents who told us, “échale ganas.” #HACERproud

This one’s for all the parents who told us, “échale ganas.” #HACERproud

Posted by We are mitú on Tuesday, November 12, 2019

In a recent video, mitú in partnership with the McDonald’s® HACER® National Scholarship asked three first-generation college students to write and read letters to their parents, thanking them for everything they’ve done. Even though there’s no doubt that many of us are grateful for the support of our parents, sometimes we need to just sit down and put all of this gratitude on paper. 

Stephanie Osuna-Hernandez

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Stephanie was born and raised in Inglewood, California. She was the first in her family to not only attend but also to graduate from a university. She is currently a freelance digital media director and video producer whose work/films center on telling the stories of people of color.

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Stephanie’s letter is a touching reminder of the way our parents made sure we had everything we needed to be successful, regardless of finances, or where they came from. 

Cesar Camacho

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Cesar attended a university in Chicago where he helped create a Spanglish radio show that later got picked up by a major network, which gave him and other Latino students an outlet to voice and share stories/struggles of the Latino millennial. Cesar now works in the PR/Advertising industry where he hopes to bring more POC into the campaigns he works on, in order to make sure more faces are seen and voices are heard.

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When you’re Latino, the choice to move away from home can be especially hard on our parents. Like Cesar, and for many of us, we knew that it would be hard, but in the end, it would challenge us to be stronger and build independence.

Andrea Cardenas

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Andrea is not only a full-time student at a university in California, but she also runs a makeup brand that pledges to donate a percentage of each sale to an all-girls and teens orphanage in Mexico.

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Our parents can be the best teachers we’ve ever had because the lessons they taught aren’t learned in a classroom, yet they can make the biggest impact. Observing how they managed their obstacles can set a precedent for how we ourselves approach everything life throws at us, especially in the whirlwind of college.

For many Latinos here in the US, the pursuit of higher education is an expectation that’s been instilled in us from a very early age. When our parents got home after a long day at work, tired from the difficult jobs they had, it wasn’t rare to hear, “¡Por eso tienes que estudiar, para que no estés como yo!” – study, so you don’t end up like me! But really, it’s because of their resilience and unconditional support that many of us go after a college education.

Stories like these are familiar to so many of us. Remembering the struggles our parents faced as they led us through school and into college means that our accomplishments are theirs, as well. If you’re about to embark on your own college journey, remember that resources like McDonald’s® HACER® National Scholarship can help you with college – so making your parents proud is just a little bit easier. Don’t miss out on this opportunity: the application period ends February 5th, 2020!