Things That Matter

When Will Elizabeth Holmes Be Deported Back To Her Planet Of White Privilege And Sociopathy?

When Will Elizabeth Holmes Be Deported Back To Her Planet Of White Privilege And Sociopathy?

If you don’t know the story of Elizabeth Homles by now HBO’s latest documentary “The Inventor: Out for Blood In Silicon Valley” will get you somewhere on the scale of understanding. The film, which debuted Monday night, works to debunk all that we know to be true about Holmes. First, that she is con-artist who convinced rich older men to invest in a falsehood while armed with a black turtleneck. And second, that in doing so destroyed peoples’ lives.

The Alex Gibney directed documentary softly focuses its lens on the Stanford dropout and disgraced Silicon Valley who sold investors on an impossible idea.

While Gibney’s documentary is sympathetic to Holmes, we must remember the facts about Holmes and her company Theranos as we know them. The facts: she captivated the world and big-time business investors ( Rupert Murdoch and Betsy Devos among them) when she promised the world’s most revolutionary invention: an at-home toolkit that, with just a prick of a finger and a single drop of blood, could run up to 200 diagnostic health tests.

More facts: Holmes would never have been able to pull off such a ruse if she’d been a Latina.

The most appalling aspect of Holmes’ story is also what the documentary fails to address. The blind faith in her company would never have been lent to one of the 4.4 million Latino-owned small business in the U.S.

I am obsessed with the fact that she was able to walk up to anyone, ask for a 100 million dollars and it was given to…

Posted by Patty Rodriguez on Sunday, March 17, 2019

Older, established white men (and Betsy Devos) placed all their faith and finances in Holmes’ idea only find years later that they had invested in a company built on sand. Up until Theranos’s rise, Holmes was a Stanford drop out, her great grandfather was an entrepreneur and her uncle was a doctor. In the film, Theranos chairman Don Lucas explains that he was certain that Holmes, at the time a 22-year-old college dropout, “came by it naturally” because of the accomplishments of the men in her family.

Because nowhere in 2019 Trump- run USA would a Latino get away wit this caca.

So for real. Lock her up.

Check out the trailer for this woman below.🍜

Male-dominated, underrepresentation and privilege are just some words to describe the tech industry. Less than 20 percent of women make up the tech space, and that number drops even lower when it comes to women of color. But these stats haven’t discouraged Latinas from leaving their mark in the tech world.

Here, 7 Latinas killing it in the tech industry.

1. Gretel Perera

(Courtesy of Gretel Perera)

For Venezuelan-born Gretel Perera, the most exciting part of technology is storytelling.

The PR professional has been specializing in tech companies for the past decade, working for brands like HomeAway, Evernote and Dell. In 2014, she and friend Rocio Medina felt there wasn’t a community for Latinas in the industry and together founded Latinas in Tech, a nonprofit organization with the mission to connect, support and empower Latina women working in the field.

Their org, which Perera calls a “full-time passion,” started out as a couple Latinas in the tech space meeting up at bars to discuss the challenges they faced at work. Fast-forward to today, they host meetups inside tech companies like Google and Lyft.

“Our community has more than 2 thousand women working in tech, from more than 15 countries. In all the major companies, we have a presence. Women who are entrepreneurs, investors, marketing professionals, engineers, cybersecurity experts, etc,’” Perera told FIERCE.

There are challenges Latinas face when culturally adapting to an environment as dynamic as Silicon Valley. To start: It’s fast-paced and male-dominated, but Latinas in Tech offers meetups and various panels in the U.S. and Mexico that educate women on how to use their culture as a strategic tool for their careers.

“You have a different perspective you can bring to a company,” she said. “We want Latinas to learn how to package it and market themselves differently compared to someone who doesn’t have it.”

2. Janel Martinez

(Courtesy of Janel Martinez)

Janel Martinez was born in New York to Honduran parents. Growing up, she was obsessed with all things media. From watching the news after school to catching up on popular shows, she was very aware from an early age of what representation looked like in mainstream media and that she never saw a complete view of her identity in it.

She started her own career in media at a business publication. While interviewing entrepreneurs, she realized they all said something similar: “I created this because I saw there was no solution for it.” She carried these words with her until 2013, when she launched Ain’t I Latina, a digital destination that celebrates and highlights Afro-Latinas.

Her advice for young Latinas looking to get into the tech space? Go for it! With Latinas only making up a small percentage of the tech industry, Martinez understands why discouraged women of color might ask, “Why would I go for it if my chances are lower than my white counterparts?” But she doesn’t want them to be brought down by the numbers.

“There’s going to be times you’re the only Latina in the room, but don’t let that hold you back because you definitely are deserving and worthy to be in that space if you want it,” she told us.

3. Nathalie Molina Niño

(Courtesy of Nathalie Molina Niño)

Nathalie Molina Niño started her first startup when she was 20. Now, nearly two decades later, she is the CEO and founder of BRAVA Investments, which targets high-growth, scalable businesses that deliver a measurable economic benefit to women.

That’s not all. Molina Niño also founded the Center for Women Entrepreneurs at Barnard College of Columbia University, where she teaches; works on a TV show about women of color in STEM, whose pilot has been picked up by Freeform; and has a book, LEAPFROG: The New Revolution for Women Entrepreneurs, that is set to hit bookshelves in August. The book was inspired by the myth, often perpetuated in other startup literature, that people who want to open businesses have wealthy friends and family that can write them checks.

Born to a Colombian mother and an Ecuadorian father, Molina Niño says what she admires most about the Latino community is the spirit we have to be the most entrepreneurial people in this country.

4. Natalia Carrasco

(Courtesy of Natalia Carrasco)

In San Francisco, Bolivian-born Natalia Carrasco is the director of strategy for The Town Kitchen, a community-driven food company that employs and empowers low-income youth by delivering chef-crafted, boxed lunches to corporate clients.

Carrasco has always been fascinated with using business and tech for good. “Technology can be super powerful, and when you apply that power into social good, you can make a very important impact,” Carrasco told us.

No day is ever the same for her at The Town Kitchen, but she is always looking to implement technology tools into her workplace in order to create a more efficient office. She’s currently working on a personal project that will gather local vendors with a social impact. Through it, she hopes to provide a directory for companies and individuals looking to purchase goods and services from a brand that has a positive impact in their community, whether it be vendors that hire formerly incarcerated youth or businesses run by people of color.

5. Elena Buenrostro

(Courtesy of Elena Buenrostro)

From New York to Australia, California-born Elena Buenrostro is building an international community for women who fly drones. This Mexican-American certified drone pilot never imagined she’d be doing this work. With a background in video production, last year, after deciding she would hike the Great Wall of China, she knew she wanted to make a video of it with a fresh perspective. To do so, she bought a drone.

Buenrostro became obsessed with flying her drone and soon realized that there wasn’t a community for women who were drone pilots, so she co-founded Women Who Drone, a digital space for female drone pilots, enthusiasts and aerial content creators.

Together, they strive to educate and inspire women to join the UAV industry by providing everything from workshops to brand ambassador positions in all parts of the world.  

With more than 17 thousand followers on Instagram, the Women Who Drone community continues to expand, bringing in women from all walks of life.

She now teaches people how to fly, and says the most rewarding part is when they tell her they bought a drone because of her.

“It’s a booming industry. It’s going to be worth 127 billion by 2020, and only 4 percent of women are involved in that. Drones are going to be a large part of the future,” she says.

6. Ariel Lopez

(Courtesy of Ariel Lopez)

Born in Florida and raised in North Carolina, Puerto Rican entrepreneur, career coach and public speaker Ariel Lopez is helping to train individuals on the skills they need to find careers in tech and media spaces.

She’s the founder and CEO of 2020Shift, a startup that helps tech and digital media companies diversify their recruitment process and provides leadership and skills-based training.

Lopez came up with 2020Shift in 2014, after seeing the disparity in tech among woman and people of color. Her background is in recruiting and talent acquisition, and by helping many startups hire talent, she was able to get an inside look at what companies want when hiring for tech positions.

“I started it really in the effort to prepare people for these roles and raise awareness on all the different things that you can do in tech regardless of your skillset or your background,” she says. “The misconception is: learn how to code, become an engineer and that’s your golden ticket in. When you can literally do hundreds, if not thousands, of other things within the space.”

What’s next for 2020Shift and Lopez? Knac, a platform that will be launching this summer that will actually let people showcase their skills to employers through small assessments and hiring challenges. Some of the employers participating include Snapchat, Vimeo, MasterCard and more.

7. Soledad Antelada Toledano

(Courtesy of Soledad Antelada Toledano)

Argentine-born Soledad Antelada Toledano works in cybersecurity operations at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in San Francisco. It’s not an industry that has many women, so in 2014, she started Girls Can Hack, an organization determined to close the gender gap in tech.

Through her org, she offers guidance and empowerment to women looking to enter the cybersecurity world.

“Only 10 percent of people in cybersecurity are women, and the numbers are not going up. It is an extremely hostile field for women,” she says. “Cybersecurity nowadays is the base of the change and advancement in tech. It is changing the world politically and economically, and women are missing out.”

Antelada is also the president of The Women Scientists and Engineers Council at her lab, and she is continuing to work hard to bring diversity and inclusion to the cybersecurity space.

Read: In A White, Male Tech World, These Latinas Are Kicking Ass And Creating Space For Other Women Of Color

Sponsored – How Every Soccer Mom Feels During Fútbol Season

Culture

Sponsored – How Every Soccer Mom Feels During Fútbol Season

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Being a mom is special for so many reasons. There’s the love that you have for your child, for starters. And then there’s all the amazing things that come along with parenting – helping your kiddo as they learn to read and write, watching them make friends, and of course, the moment that they join their first sports team. In this case little league soccer

Despite the craziness of life and balancing of hectic schedules, a fútbol mom always finds that magical, unexpected energy when it’s time to cheer on their baby at a soccer match.

Here’s how every soccer mom feels during fútbol season (aka the craziest sport season).

1. You’re besties with all the other soccer moms.

Let’s be real: one of the best parts about being a soccer mom is all the chisme. Latina moms love to be social, so it’s no surprise that you love soccer season. You keep up with all the gossip with the other moms, while everyone cheers on their kids.

2. There’s always a fear of running out of snacks.

There is nothing scarier than a bunch of ravenous, hungry little soccer players, and luckily fútbol mamás always turn out when it comes to snack duty. Is there a little competition to be the mom with the best snacks? Of course there is. This is little league soccer, people – it’s serious.

3. You have to be the mom who cheers the loudest.

If you don’t lose your voice from cheering, were you ever really there? It doesn’t matter how long, busy, stressful the week leading up to the game was or how crazy work and life got – soccer moms always have that surge of unexpected energy when it comes to a fútbol game.  

4. It’s better to pretend you saw your kid make a goal than say the truth: you were scrolling through Instagram.

It’s impossible to catch every single goal that a kid makes, give yourself a break. Sometimes it’s just better to pretend to have seen the goal than to confess that you missed it because of Instagram. Moms are only human, ok!

5. You know when it’s time to bust out the custom-made soccer jerseys.

Those fabulous fútbol jerseys you made that say, “Go team go!” on them. Your kids might be mortified by these, but totally worth an eye roll from them.

6. Rain or shine, you’re there. With ponchos and umbrellas for everyone!

Being prepared – and not just with snacks and cheers. You’re prepared for every single situation, including bad weather. The other moms are grateful when you start handing out the extra rain ponchos and umbrellas. Your over-prepared abuela would be proud.

7. You’re ready to step in as the coach at a moment’s notice.

You’re not just a fan of your kid, you’re also a huge fan of fútbol itself! You know the game better than anyone, and you’re ready to step in as a substitute coach whenever they might need you. Which, of course, is rarely ever, but a soccer mom can dream, can’t she?

There’s something so fun about being a soccer mom. Life can be so busy and stressful, but when that unexpected energy hits you the second you pull up to the fútbol field, there’s simply nothing better.

Entertainment – Quiz: As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.

Entertainment

Entertainment – Quiz: As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.

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It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages

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“I solemnly swear that I am up to no good.” rn― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
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“The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.” rn― Elie Wiesel

I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” rn― Albert Einstein

“That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.
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You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go..

If you judge people, you have no time to love them

“There is never a time or place for true love. It happens accidentally, in a heartbeat, in a single flashing, throbbing moment.” rn― Sarah Dessen, The Truth About Forever
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This life is what you make it. No matter what, you're going to mess up sometimes, it's a universal truth. But the good part is you get to decide how you're going to mess it up. Girls will be your friends - they'll act like it anyway. But just remember, some come, some go. The ones that stay with you through everything - they're your true best friends. Don't let go of them. Also remember, sisters make the best friends in the world. As for lovers, well, they'll come and go too. And baby, I hate to say it, most of them - actually pretty much all of them are going to break your heart, but you can't give up because if you give up, you'll never find your soulmate. You'll never find that half who makes you whole and that goes for everything. Just because you fail once, doesn't mean you're gonna fail at everything. Keep trying, hold on, and always, always, always believe in yourself, because if you don't, then who will, sweetie? So keep your head high, keep your chin up, and most importantly, keep smiling, because life's a beautiful thing and there's so much to smile about.”

As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.
Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.

It is better to remain silent at the risk of being thought a fool, than to talk and remove all doubt of it.
We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars

Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.
Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift of God, which is why we call it the present.

The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read.

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