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A 9-Year-Old Girl Was Detained By Border Patrol On Her Way To School

A 9-Year-Old Girl Was Detained By Border Patrol On Her Way To School

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A 9-year-old U.S. citizen was separated from her mother for 36 hours after agents at the border accused her of lying about her citizenship.

Like thousands of students in our country, Julia Isabel Amparo Medina’s daily commute requires her to cross the U.S. border.

The fourth-grade student attends Nicoloff Elementary School in San Ysidro, California and was in a carpool to school from her home in Tijuana when she ran into traffic. Medina, was commuting to school in a car driven by her mother’s friend Michelle Cardena, Cardena’s two children and her own older 14-year-old brother, Oscar. When the long line to get into the U.S. seemed to be jampacked upon their 4 a.m arrival, Cardenas instructed the kids in her car to walk to the border. She assured them that when they reached it, she would call them an Uber to get them the rest of the way to their school.

But Medina and her never made it across the border or to school that day.

According to the New York Times who talked to a Customs and Border Protection spokesman, two Amparo and her brother arrived at one of the San Ysidro port of entry facilities for pedestrians at 10:15 a.m. last Monday.

Upon their arrival, Amparo and her brother presented their U.S. passports to a CBP officer who soon accused her of being someone else. Note: Amparo’s passport image which was taken years before so she did not look exactly like herself. They also accused her brother of smuggling.

A CBP spokesperson has said that Amparo “provided inconsistent information during her inspection, and CBP officers took the 9-year-old into custody to perform due diligence in confirming her identity and citizenship.”

After CBP officers the confirmed that her brother was a U.S. citizen, he was permitted to enter the U.S while his sister stayed behind. It wasn’t until 6:30 pm on Tuesday, that Amparo was confirmed to be a U.S. citizen as well and was released and admitted to the U.S. to her mother.

Speaking to NBC7, Amparo said she was “scared” of her detention and that she was “sad because I didn’t have my mom or my brother. I was completely by myself.”

According to Amparo’s mother Thelma Galaxia, her daughter claims that she was told by an officer that she and her brother would be released if she admitted to being her cousin. Galaxia claims that officers also convinced her son Oscar to sign a document that Amparo was his cousin and not his sister.

When Galaxia was alerted that her children had been detained she contacted the Mexican consulate.

After being notified by the consulate that her daughter would be released at the San Ysidro Port of Entry. While the family felt relieved to be grateful to be reunited with their daughter, Galaxia says the separation should never have happened.

Over the weekend, Twitter was swift to express their outrage over the incident.

Some even expressed their dismay of having a similar situation happen to them.

Many are using the incident as an example of the racial issues plaguing so many U.S. citizens like Amparo.

So many of the comments included outside opinions from those who have yet to experience the direct targetting of ICE.

Over all, nearly everyone was quick to point out the saddest aspect of Amparo’s experience.


Read: Preschool Students Are Doing Active Shooter Drills And I Guess This Is The New Normal Now

New brid.tv format – Diane Guerrero Is Promoting An Immigration Hotline That Allows Women In Prison To Contact Their Family Free Of Charge

Entertainment

New brid.tv format – Diane Guerrero Is Promoting An Immigration Hotline That Allows Women In Prison To Contact Their Family Free Of Charge

Season 7 of “Orange Is The New Black” exposed several truths about ICE detention facilities and the struggles that jailed migrants face. From the lack of resources to the separation of children from parents, the Netflix original series was incredibly on point about these travesties that are being perpetrated with the permission of the United States government.

One of the major themes that impacted Maritza, Blanca and the other ICE detainees in the series was their inability to contact anyone for help. In the episodes, it was impossible for the women to call friends, family or lawyers for assistance without a phone card. Phone cards required cash. Each minute cost about $3 per minute. When the characters did have money for a card, the kiosk to buy the phone cards and stamps was broken. Essentially, they were trapped without the ability to call or write for help.

In order to combat this problem, the women of Spanish Harlem find a free number that the detainees can use and, as it turns out, the number and the organization it contacts is real.

Twitter / @dianeguerrero_

In Season 7, Gloria and Flaca find a number for the real immigration assistance charity, Freedom for Immigrants. Back in 2010, attorney Christina Fialho and cultural anthropologist Christina Mansfield co-created California’s first visitation program at the West County Detention Facility. From there, the organization grew to include other facilities.

Their visitation program joined forces with four other similar programs to become a non-partisan, non-profit organization called Community Initiatives for Visiting Immigrants in Confinement (CIVIC). This organization would later change its name to Freedom for Immigrants and would continue to help jailed migrants get access to the outside world.

In 2015, the program started its own national hotline that connects people in these detention facilities with volunteers and resources who can help.

Twitter / @MirgantFreedom

The organization sometimes receives as many as 14,000 calls per month from migrants from 148 different countries who speak over 80 different languages. The hotline is completely free and offers help to those who couldn’t otherwise afford the detention facilities’ expensive calls. Just like in Season 7 of “Orange Is The New Black,” the hotline helps connect detainees with pro bono legal services.

In the series, Maritza and Flaca write down Freedom for Immigrant’s hotline in order to distribute it to other detainees. However, Gloria cautions against getting too involved for fear of retaliation against the women. Sure enough, Maritza is soon deported as soon as the guards catch on to her actions.

Unfortunately, this same retaliation was aimed at Freedom for Immigrants last year and it limited the organization’s ability to help their migrant clients.

Twitter / @MigrantFreedom

Although visitors have the right to pass out their number to detainees, members of Freedom for Immigrants have always been cautious when passing out their hotline number. They were aware that guards and officials were not supportive of a free line to the outside. In 2018, ICE blocked access to Freedom for Immigrants number in their facilities. This occurred after volunteers for the program refused to sign away their rights to speak to the media about conditions inside the centers.

Blocking their number impacted the organization’s ability to offer support to the ICE detainees. The migrants already had such little help and contact with the outside world. By blocking Freedom of Immigrant’s number, ICE officials completely took away access to the outside world and all hope they had for freedom.

This isn’t the first bout of retaliation that the organization has experienced.

Twitter / @MsLauraGomez

Back in 2013, ICE shut down three visitation programs that Freedom for Immigrants was affiliated with. This happened following a Huffington Post editorial that the organization wrote about conditions of these facilities. In the past, ICE has also blocked the personal cell phone numbers of volunteers to further isolate detainees from the outside world. In the meantime, donors to the Freedom for Immigrants organization have helped volunteers spread calling cards to detainees as the nonprofit continues to fight to have their number unblocked.

While free people outside of these facilities can survive threats and retaliation, migrants trapped in detention do not have the same freedoms and assurances.

Twitter / @democracynow

When jailed migrants are caught attempting to access these helpful services, they also face retaliation. Just like Maritza, they have to worry about threats of deportation. Isolation, violence and transfers to other centers are also tactics used against detainees to keep them compliant.

Ultimately, ICE does not want these migrants to have any access to the outside world. They don’t want them to have help or hope. “Orange Is The New Black” is obviously a work of fiction but the series got this detail right and it’s painful to see. However, we can’t look away. To look away would be a disservice to the jailed migrants and the volunteers trying to free them.

You can help further the cause of Freedom for Immigrants by volunteering or donating here.

Political AnyClip – Motel 6 Was Giving Guests Lists To ICE, Now They Are Paying $20 Million To The Victims

Entertainment

Political AnyClip – Motel 6 Was Giving Guests Lists To ICE, Now They Are Paying $20 Million To The Victims

A year and a half ago, people were appalled to know that the guests staying at Motel 6 in Arizona had their information compromised. It wasn’t hackers looking to score credit card information, but immigration officials aiming to track down undocumented immigrants.

When people realized that employees of Motel 6 gave away private information about hotel guests to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a boycott ensued. Furthermore — because that tactic is extremely illegal — immigration advocates sued on behalf of thousands of people.

A year later Motel 6 faced two class action lawsuits, one in Washington and another in Arizona. Both cases have closed in huge settlements.

Motel 6 settled their cases out of court and agreed to pay $20 million to all guests with “Latin-sounding names.”

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The guests in Arizona got a whopping $7 million settlement, while in Washington, Motel 6 guests there will get $12 million. Guests with Latino-sounding names faced undue stress from having to answer ICE agents knocking on their room doors unexpectedly. However, there is one problem facing attorneys and those in the class action lawsuits.

Attorneys don’t know how to find the guests impacted by the lawsuits.

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Some people stayed at Motel 6 under fake names, others perhaps are not in the country anymore, so lawyers have one year to find patrons of the motel or else all of that money goes to waste.

Each guest — roughly 80,000 people — have to either come forward to get their money or else they will just lose it. However, it’s only natural that people are afraid to come forward because of their immigration status.

“The concern here is that this could be a victory in name only,” Geoffrey Hoffman, director of the University of Houston Law Center Immigration Clinic told Bloomberg News. “It does create a situation here where the party is penalized, but how will it amount to restitution to compensate these victims if their clients have been deported, and any records of deportation are held by ICE?”

READ: Motel 6 Is Being Sued By Two States For Violating Privacy Acts By Giving Guests Lists To ICE

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