Entertainment

Not Everyone Knows That Jennifer Lopez’s Famous Green Versace Grammy Dress Actually Launched Google Images

In Summer 2019 the Council of Fashion Designers of America will acknowledge what her fans have always known: that Jennifer Lopez is a fashion icon. On April 16th, the CFDA announced that Lopez will be the 2019 recipient of their Fashion Icon Award. Considered the “Oscar’s of Fashion,” the award has been bestowed on impecable dressers such as Beyoncé, Rihanna, and Lady Gaga. However, this is the first time she or any a Latina will be honored by the council as an Icon.

Ever since the world received their first glimpse of JLo, her genuine talent and impressive personal style have won her fame and fans. Whether she’s wearing couture or a tracksuit, Lopez has the confidence and personal style to own any look. We can’t wait to see what outfit she will rock at the CFDA Awards on June 3rd but — considering what we’ve already seen — we know it will be iconic.

Here are some of JLo’s most en vogue looks that prove she’s an undisputed fashion icon.

1. The most fly of the Fly Girls.

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Tumblr / @bibberly

The first time the world got a real look from Lopez, she was showing off her moves with other dancers on “In Living Color.” Not only did the comedy show hype us to her dance moves, but it also introduced her cool-girl style. In addition to being one of the few people who actually looked good in the early 90s, Lopez was a fan of crop tops from way back when. Some things just never go out of style.

2. ¡Viva Selena!

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Livingly.com

For her part as the Tejano queen, Lopez borrowed some staple styles from another Latina fashion icon. When the public first saw JLo as Selena, there was an honest shock at how right she looked in the singer’s classic outfits. Selena’s purple jumpsuit, bustier, and even her casual styles were amazing on her. We should have known then to expect great things from the starlet — both in her career and in her future looks.

3. Glitz and glamour at the Oscar’s.

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WMagazine.com

Lopez’s performance in “Selena” earned her critical acclaim and a nomination for a Golden Globe. Later that same year, she turned heads at the 69th annual Academy awards. Wearing a lacy light purple Badgely Mischka gown, JLo shined like the star she was quickly becoming.

4. The era of bikini tops and joggers.

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OKMagazine.com

On May 11, 1999, Lopez released her first music video for “If You Had My Love.” Besides bringing us a video with a unique voyeuristic look at cyberspace at the dawn of the new millennium, it also offered several hip looks. While all outfits in this video are still pretty stylish, this bikini top, jogger, and body jewelry outfit is quintessential JLo.

5. Jenny from the Block.

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FashionIsMyObsession.com

What’s needed for a good JLo music video? A romantic Male lead, amazing choreography and several fierce costume changes. That’s why “Jenny From The Block” is a great video and a fashion icon moment. It’s hard to choose just one chic fashion choice but Lopez made those Manolo boots famous so this look has to wins.

6. The dress that launched Google Images.

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EntertainmentWeekly.com

After the public saw Lopez in that legendary green Versace dress at the 2000 Grammy’s, they couldn’t get enough. In fact, searches for JLo in that dress was the most popular search query Google ever saw. Due to this, the young company decided to flesh out an image driven search platform — aka Google Images. Considering this dress launched a tool most people use every day, we think it’s safe to say that Lopez is a fashion icon.

7. Everyone wanted this look back in day.

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People

Sometimes when we look back at clothing from decades past, we’re completely baffled by what we see. Other times, those outfits are worn by JLo and we realize we’d still like to cop this look. The early 2000’s saw velour track suits become popular and Lopez’s “I’m Real” video did a lot to spark that trend.

8. The Bennifer phase had its share of looks.

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Hello Magazine

Fun fact: it’s thanks to the union of JLo and former fiance Ben Affleck that we have fun celeb couple names. Since Bennifer split, both have moved on to bigger careers and more compatible loves. JLo was going through a glam phase during their relationship and she made some really great fashion choices — including the gown she wore to the “Gigli” premiere. The movie ended as poorly as the relationship but at least we have this great dress to remember both by.

9. A little black dress that’s anything but basic.

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Glamour.com

In 2013, the Grammy’s enforced a new dress code collectively written by all the abuelas of the world. The new code banned thongs, any necklines cut too low and all hems cut too high. Pretty controversial for the often risky reward show. Leave it to JLo to stay within the rules while still maintaining making it sexy.

10. Giving the Sun reasons to be jealous.

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Pinterest

Besides looking great on the red carpet, in music videos and in everyday life, JLo also brings her amazing style to editorials. In this 2013 “Harper’s Bazaar” feature, the star combined tall gladiator sandals, a canary yellow mini dress and soft, sunkissed waves. The styling is relatively simple but the impact very memorable.

11. A look that combines fashion and art.

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WalesOnline.co.uk

Some times we see clothing that reminds us that fashion is as much art as anything found in a museum. JLo wore such a dress for the 2017 Billboard Latin Music Awards. Designed by Welsh designer Julien MacDonald, the shimmering black gown has intricate cutouts to make use of negative space. It makes for a show-stopping look that’s meant to walk the runway or red carpet.

12. Even her stage looks are flawless.

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Instagram / @jlo

Lopez gives nothing less than visual perfection with her regular wardrobe but she brings it to a whole new level with her stage looks. Her 2018 VMA performance for MTV’s Video Vanguard is a great example of this. The golden bodysuit, sparkly thigh highs and sheer flowing cape make her look like a high fashion superhero.

13. Styled head to toe.

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Instagram / @jlo

Sure, she’s an entrepreneur, movie star, award winning performer and fashionista but JLo hasn’t forgotten where she came from. Here dancer origins have brought her back to TV as a judge on NBC’s “World of Dance.” To celebrate season 2 of the dance competition, Lopez shared a series of pics featuring this ruffled blouse, golden harem pants and one of the most intricate braided updo you’ll ever see.

14. JLo’s style for “InStyle.”

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Instagram / @jlo

Casual and colorful, Lopez blessed us with this ensemble in a December 2018 spread in “InStyle.” The tunic dress is Valentino Haute Couture as are the gorgeous emerald suede boots. Topped off with Chopard Haute earrings, this is an effortlessly hip outfit.

15. Green dress 2.0.

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Instagram / @jlo

That “InStyle” spread gave us so much JLo fashion goodness that we’re still obsessing over it. One such bold look is the sparkly Valentino Haute Couture cape she wore with nothing else on. The star looks great in anything and we’re more than a little jelly. Still, we’re okay with it if it means we get to see great editorial styles like this.

16. As pink as she pleases.

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Instagram / @jlo

Looking like she just stepped out of a telenovela, JLo shared this fine feathered frock on social media. The cut is modest but she still looks incredibly feminine and romantic in this soft pink color. The glitzy addition of those blinged-out earrings are just icing on the cake.

17. #GymGoals

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Pinterest

This might seem like a weird flex, but this seemingly low-glamore ensemble is one of our favorites on this list. Who else do you know that looks this high fashion in a track suit? Nobody, that’s who. Her addition of shiny stilettos and oversized gold hoops has us really vibing with this complete picture.

18. This dress is a religious experience.

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Glamour.com

The MET Gala is all about pageantry and our favorite looks are always the ones that dress for that year’s theme. Lopez did great service to 2018’s theme of “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” with her ornate Balmain gown. What’s even better is that the hand embellished piece was later auctioned off to benefit HIV research. We love a good cause as much as we love this dress.

19. Cute and sexy all in one.

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SugarPop.com

As an international star, JLo does her fair share of jet-setting. One such trip to the United Arab Emirates saw Lopez and fiance Alex Rodriguez stepping out to elite nightclub Base. There, the star rocked this adorable and flirty Balmain minidress. The combination of soft ruffles and peek-a-boo cutouts make for a style that is both sweet and sexy.

20. Simply jaw dropping.

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Elle.com

If you ever doubt Lopez’s fashion sense, take a look at this awe-inspiring dress. Worn to the “Vanity Fair” Oscar after-party, this Tom Ford mosaic dress illuminated with hues of pink, purple, blue and silver. This gown photographed beautifully and was the absolute perfect choice for a master poser like JLo. The girl really knows her angles.

Brand safe – A Geographer Just Created A Digital Map Of Mexico Highlighting Taco Shops And It’s A Thing Of Beauty

Culture

Brand safe – A Geographer Just Created A Digital Map Of Mexico Highlighting Taco Shops And It’s A Thing Of Beauty

featured image credit goes here

One of the biggest changes that the so called digital revolution has brought to our lives is the capacity that today’s computer systems have to process huge amounts of data. Processors today are able to run algorithms that bring together millions of data entries to find trends, cluster groups of similar objects and generate visualizations that can help us understand even the most complex aspects of science and culture. This is known popularly as “big data” and has changed the ways in which governments and companies understand reality and make decisions. For example, before high speed processing mathematicians took literally years to make sense of census data and find correlations between factors such as socioeconomic status, ethnicity, age and literacy levels.

Guess what? This can be done today with a few clicks as computers bring together millions upon millions of data entries and make sense of it all. It all sounds very geeky, but big data is defining how we live our lives, from how traffic lights coordinate to how much tax you gotta pay each year.

So all this geeky, nerdy stuff should be put to good use, o no?

Enter Mexican geographer Baruch Sangines, a true wizard when it comes to generating great data visualizations.

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Credit: @datavizero / Twitter

This young scientist is the Chief Data Scientist at a company called Jetty, and he does some pretty groundbreaking research on pressing social issues such as housing and poverty.

His LinkedIn profile is pretty impressive: “Experience in public and private sector with skills to analyze and visualize data related to: commuting, transit, housing, tourism, migration, security, and urban environment. Expert in territorial analysis and passionate about the cartography and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to visualize small and big data”. Wow. hold your horses, Einstein! He is a proud graduate of Mexico’s National University and has Master’s Degree on Demographics and Statistics. 

So why did he go viral on Mexican social media in the past few days? We mean, science is sexy but not viral sexy (sadly!). All because of this map:

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Credit: @datavizero / Twitter

No, it is not a visualization of WiFi points in Mexico. No, it is not a rendition of cartel activity. No, it is not a highlight of the areas in which development runs at a faster pace. It is about something much, much more relevant to everyday life in Mexico lindo y querido. Any guesses?

Nothing is more important than a delicious taco when you most need it! 

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Credit: The Splendid Table

Just look at that tortilla, a bit crispy, a bit soft… and that perfectly marinated meat… 

Well, Baruch created a visualization of taco stands in Mexico and nos ponemos de pie ante tal maravilla! 

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Baruch called this visualization Taco Universe, and it showcases all the registered taco stands and shops in the country. We can clearly see that there is a high concentration of taco shrines in the capital Mexico City, and that hotspots like Cancun and Cabo are also highlighted, perhaps thanks to gringo tourism craving fish tacos. The scientists used the database Directorio Estadístico Nacional de Unidades Económicas (Denue) (Statistical National Directory of Economic Units) from the federal census agency INEGI. The map highlights how taco culture is primarily based in the center of the country, with local varieties such as Puebla’s tacos arabes (a shawarma like type) increasing the traffic in that area. 

But it is important to note that many taco stands are not accounted for (and that is not this scientist’s fault).

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Thousands of Mexicans subsist in an informal economy with businesses that are not registered and pay no taxes. Among these businesses, mobile taco stands reign supreme. There are hundreds of taco stands all around the country that are set up informally. Sometimes you can find the most delicious tacos there! You can also find informal vendors selling tacos de canasta, a variety that is literally carried in a basket. This map does not take these informal enterprises into account, even though they are key to Mexico’s taco culinary tradition. 

So you are curious about tacos de canasta now, aren’t you? 

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Well, just look at these crispy, sweaty, fat-rich babes. Tacos de canasta are filled with guisados or stews, or with refried beans. We are almost sure that Baruch did not include them in his map, but we can forgive him for making us crave unos taquitos (we bet you are calling your comadres or compas right now to hit the taco stand) and showing us how Mexico is a country that despite its many challenges still finds time to live up to the old adage: barriga llena, corazon contento. 

Vogue Mexico Teamed Up With British Vogue To Show The Beauty Of ‘Muxes’ An Ancestral Gender-Fluid Indigenous Community

Fierce

Vogue Mexico Teamed Up With British Vogue To Show The Beauty Of ‘Muxes’ An Ancestral Gender-Fluid Indigenous Community

featured image credit goes here

Sometimes, fashion is more than just a mirror of society. In a few instances, the fashion industry has actually been responsible for reshaping reality rather than just mirroring it. One way it does this is by breaking taboos and introducing marginalized ideas into the mainstream. The current visibility of transgender people is a development that the fashion world has embraced in recent years. Granted, fashion’s focus on the topic is, more often than not, on the “blurring of traditional lines between genders” to explore androgyny, but many designers and brands are currently emphasizing on a ‘gender-neutral’ and non-binary ethos. The editorial side of fashion however, has been a bit slow to embrace representation and support genderqueer people—but this month, Vogue Mexico and Latin-America, in collaboration with British Vogue, are leading the charge, by dedicating their cover story to a small group of people in Juchitán Oaxaca who seek to live outside of binary labels: Los Muxes.

Vogue Mexico and Latin-America has proven to be the most ‘woke’ publication of Conde Nast’s portfolio this year.

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instagram @voguemexico

 The magazine has doubled up on its efforts for representation and diversity. Just this year they made history by featuring an indigenous woman, Yalitza Aparicio, on the cover of a magazine for the very first time, ever. A few months later they featured four Afro-Latinas on their cover and opened the floor to discussion about what being Afro-Latina means. Just last month they honored indigenous women of different parts of Latin America for their 20th anniversary issue. And now, the magazine is shining a light on a centuries-old non-binary indigenous community of rural Mexico, and introducing them to the world. 

In recent years, Oaxaca has become somewhat of a trendy destination. 

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instagram @oaxtravel

The Zapotec state is a multicultural hub in the south of Mexico known for its delicious climate, rich food and complex history. The people of Oaxaca have fought hard to keep a lot of their centuries-old traditions and beliefs alive, and one of these beliefs —or rather, a group of people— is called “muxes.”

In Juchitán, a small indigenous town in Southern Oaxaca, a community of individuals known as ‘Muxes’, seek to live free of binary labels “male” and “female.”

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instagram @johnohono

 The word muxes also spelled muxhes in some instances, comes from the Spanish word for woman “mujer,” and it generally represents people who are assigned male at birth, but identify as non-binary. Muxes have their own gender identity, different from what the West has traditionally dubbed to be female and male. 

The iterations among the Muxe community and their self-identifications vary – some identify as male but are female-expressing, while others identify as female and are more closely associated with Western culture’s understanding of transgender. In their culture, the term “third gender” might be more suitable to define Muxes. 

Muxes are ‘dual’ beings, they don’t believe in being ‘female’ or ‘male’, they simply are.

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Instagram @salvadorconpan

“To be muxe is a duality. We carry out the role depending on the circumstances, sometimes I might seem like a man, and others like a woman,” says Pedro Enriquez Godínez Gutiérrez, a person known locally in Juchitán as “La Kika,” in an interview with Vogue Mexico. Apart from being a muxe, he’s the Director of Sexual Diversity of Juchitán Town Hall. 

Muxes have lived in Juchitan since pre-hispanic times, there are a few indigenous legends that explain their origins and give a faith to the antiquity of their existence.

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instagram @voguemexico

There are two legends in Juchitán, that recount the origin of Muxes. One says that San Vicente Ferrer, the holy patron of Juchitán, had a pocket with holes in it, from which they fell out of. Another version says that as he walked the earth, San Vicente Ferrer, always carried three bags: one with male seeds, another loaded with female seeds, and a third that contained both seeds, mixed up. This last bag was the one that broke as he walked through Juchitán, and that is why there are so many muxes there. 

The people of Juchitán are a sort of pre-hispanic family. In this town the women are as strong as the men and muxes are as respected as both men and women. Ironically, the system of tolerance and respect that’s existed there for centuries is considered ‘modern’, elsewhere. 

Mixes are a community that not even the 21st century can wrap its head around. 

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Instagram @rafa213

“Gubixha bizaani guirá neza guzá ca,” writes Vogue Mexico, is Zapotec for “the sun illuminated all the roads they have walked”, and perhaps that is why they can walk the streets without fear in a predominantly Catholic country that still struggles to offer equal rights for women and that is mostly intolerant of sexual orientations and preferences, Juchitán remains greatly untouched by this hate. Muxes walk the streets with flowers in their hair, they wear light huipiles —a traditional garment worn by indigenous women— and colorful skirts. This indigenous town is a model of how a culture can make space for life outside of the binary. Juchitán is an example to even the most progressive cities of the world. 

Vogue Mexico and Latin America teamed up with British Vogue to celebrate both British and Mexican talent. 

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Instagram @voguemexico

The collaboration marked the first time both publications work together on a joint story. The experience allowed both publications to exchange ideas and share their cultures. Vogue Mexico’s cover, featuring Estrella, one of the muxes from Juchitán, was shot by Tim Walker, the iconic British fashion photographer, and the story will be published on both magazines for the month of December. 

Vogue Mexico’s Editor-In-Chief took to Instagram to share the news of the cover story. 

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Instagram @karlamartinezdesalas

“It’s finally here!!! We are releasing one of our December covers early as it is a special joint collaboration with @britishvogue – thank you @edward_enninful for featur[ing] the beauty of MEXICO in the pages of British Vogue. No one could have captured the magical realism better than Tim Walker and Kate Phelan. Stay tuned for more!” wrote the Mexican editor Karla Martinez de Salas on her personal Instagram page.

Vogue Mexico’s December issue will be available nation-wide starting December 1st.  

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