Culture

Latino College Students Get The Opportunity To Read “THANK YOU” Letters To Their Parents

In a recent video, mitú in partnership with the McDonald’s® HACER® National Scholarship asked three first-generation college students to write and read letters to their parents, thanking them for everything they’ve done. Even though there’s no doubt that many of us are grateful for the support of our parents, sometimes we need to just sit down and put all of this gratitude on paper. 

Stephanie Osuna-Hernandez

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Stephanie was born and raised in Inglewood, California. She was the first in her family to not only attend but also to graduate from a university. She is currently a freelance digital media director and video producer whose work/films center on telling the stories of people of color.

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Stephanie’s letter is a touching reminder of the way our parents made sure we had everything we needed to be successful, regardless of finances, or where they came from. 

Cesar Camacho

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Cesar attended a university in Chicago where he helped create a Spanglish radio show that later got picked up by a major network, which gave him and other Latino students an outlet to voice and share stories/struggles of the Latino millennial. Cesar now works in the PR/Advertising industry where he hopes to bring more POC into the campaigns he works on, in order to make sure more faces are seen and voices are heard.

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When you’re Latino, the choice to move away from home can be especially hard on our parents. Like Cesar, and for many of us, we knew that it would be hard, but in the end, it would challenge us to be stronger and build independence.

Andrea Cardenas

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Andrea is not only a full-time student at a university in California, but she also runs a makeup brand that pledges to donate a percentage of each sale to an all-girls and teens orphanage in Mexico.

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Our parents can be the best teachers we’ve ever had because the lessons they taught aren’t learned in a classroom, yet they can make the biggest impact. Observing how they managed their obstacles can set a precedent for how we ourselves approach everything life throws at us, especially in the whirlwind of college.

For many Latinos here in the US, the pursuit of higher education is an expectation that’s been instilled in us from a very early age. When our parents got home after a long day at work, tired from the difficult jobs they had, it wasn’t rare to hear, “¡Por eso tienes que estudiar, para que no estés como yo!” – study, so you don’t end up like me! But really, it’s because of their resilience and unconditional support that many of us go after a college education.

Stories like these are familiar to so many of us. Remembering the struggles our parents faced as they led us through school and into college means that our accomplishments are theirs, as well. If you’re about to embark on your own college journey, remember that resources like McDonald’s® HACER® National Scholarship can help you with college – so making your parents proud is just a little bit easier. Don’t miss out on this opportunity: the application period ends February 5th, 2020!

A Geographer Just Created A Digital Map Of Mexico Highlighting Taco Shops And It’s A Thing Of Beauty

Culture

A Geographer Just Created A Digital Map Of Mexico Highlighting Taco Shops And It’s A Thing Of Beauty

featured image credit goes here

One of the biggest changes that the so called digital revolution has brought to our lives is the capacity that today’s computer systems have to process huge amounts of data. Processors today are able to run algorithms that bring together millions of data entries to find trends, cluster groups of similar objects and generate visualizations that can help us understand even the most complex aspects of science and culture. This is known popularly as “big data” and has changed the ways in which governments and companies understand reality and make decisions. For example, before high speed processing mathematicians took literally years to make sense of census data and find correlations between factors such as socioeconomic status, ethnicity, age and literacy levels.

Guess what? This can be done today with a few clicks as computers bring together millions upon millions of data entries and make sense of it all. It all sounds very geeky, but big data is defining how we live our lives, from how traffic lights coordinate to how much tax you gotta pay each year.

So all this geeky, nerdy stuff should be put to good use, o no?

Enter Mexican geographer Baruch Sangines, a true wizard when it comes to generating great data visualizations.

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Credit: @datavizero / Twitter

This young scientist is the Chief Data Scientist at a company called Jetty, and he does some pretty groundbreaking research on pressing social issues such as housing and poverty.

His LinkedIn profile is pretty impressive: “Experience in public and private sector with skills to analyze and visualize data related to: commuting, transit, housing, tourism, migration, security, and urban environment. Expert in territorial analysis and passionate about the cartography and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to visualize small and big data”. Wow. hold your horses, Einstein! He is a proud graduate of Mexico’s National University and has Master’s Degree on Demographics and Statistics. 

So why did he go viral on Mexican social media in the past few days? We mean, science is sexy but not viral sexy (sadly!). All because of this map:

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Credit: @datavizero / Twitter

No, it is not a visualization of WiFi points in Mexico. No, it is not a rendition of cartel activity. No, it is not a highlight of the areas in which development runs at a faster pace. It is about something much, much more relevant to everyday life in Mexico lindo y querido. Any guesses?

Nothing is more important than a delicious taco when you most need it! 

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Credit: The Splendid Table

Just look at that tortilla, a bit crispy, a bit soft… and that perfectly marinated meat… 

Well, Baruch created a visualization of taco stands in Mexico and nos ponemos de pie ante tal maravilla! 

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Baruch called this visualization Taco Universe, and it showcases all the registered taco stands and shops in the country. We can clearly see that there is a high concentration of taco shrines in the capital Mexico City, and that hotspots like Cancun and Cabo are also highlighted, perhaps thanks to gringo tourism craving fish tacos. The scientists used the database Directorio Estadístico Nacional de Unidades Económicas (Denue) (Statistical National Directory of Economic Units) from the federal census agency INEGI. The map highlights how taco culture is primarily based in the center of the country, with local varieties such as Puebla’s tacos arabes (a shawarma like type) increasing the traffic in that area. 

But it is important to note that many taco stands are not accounted for (and that is not this scientist’s fault).

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Thousands of Mexicans subsist in an informal economy with businesses that are not registered and pay no taxes. Among these businesses, mobile taco stands reign supreme. There are hundreds of taco stands all around the country that are set up informally. Sometimes you can find the most delicious tacos there! You can also find informal vendors selling tacos de canasta, a variety that is literally carried in a basket. This map does not take these informal enterprises into account, even though they are key to Mexico’s taco culinary tradition. 

So you are curious about tacos de canasta now, aren’t you? 

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Well, just look at these crispy, sweaty, fat-rich babes. Tacos de canasta are filled with guisados or stews, or with refried beans. We are almost sure that Baruch did not include them in his map, but we can forgive him for making us crave unos taquitos (we bet you are calling your comadres or compas right now to hit the taco stand) and showing us how Mexico is a country that despite its many challenges still finds time to live up to the old adage: barriga llena, corazon contento. 

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